Where does it appear in literature?

It’s actually surprisingly hard to find weed in popular fiction. Tokers are a small percentage of the population, but there’s also a likely reticence on the part of authors to engage it. That was certainly the case for me with HIGH WATER. Nothing like federal and state and international law to put a chilling effect on literature.

So let’s get started looked at pot in literature:

  • On the Road, by Jack Kerouac: Called “tea”, the characters spend a lot of time toking, especially toward the end.
  • The Mist, by Stephen King: The protagonist, in passing, mentions that he has a big sack of weed in his cupboard that he never smoked.
  • The Prince of Nothing Series, by Scott Bakker: Great (yet unfinished) fantasy series, this one portrayed hashish as being a normal intoxicant, well integrated into the culture. The main character, Akka, walks through an army camp and takes hits from strangers. However, it is far from being integral to the story.

There are others that I’ll get into later, but you get the idea: not a lot of use of pot as a main plot device, or even as something that people are normally engaging with.

This story on The Daily Beast has a few honorable mentions of weed in books. However you’ll notice that it’s often either about:

  • Crime
  • Noir
  • Excess
  • Quitting it as a plot device (Chabon’s book, which I’m not going to review here on principle: the description is about a struggling author lost in a haze of pot)

Surely not all pot smokers are out there getting themselves killed right after getting stoned?

Right?

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